coutugh:

150,000 orchids lining the walls of the Rodin Museum by Belgian florist Mark Colle for Christian Dior Haute Couture F/W 2014 

"The idea was to create transparency. Something very light. The use of phalaenopsis orchids was perfect in this particular setting – they have a feminine feel yet there is something alien and futuristic about them (which is also the reason why I enjoy working with them so much). Rather than having them hanging from the walls in a garden type of way, I thought it would be more interesting to have them go many different directions, as if they were an army of white spiders spreading out over the mirrored walls." via
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coutugh:

150,000 orchids lining the walls of the Rodin Museum by Belgian florist Mark Colle for Christian Dior Haute Couture F/W 2014 

"The idea was to create transparency. Something very light. The use of phalaenopsis orchids was perfect in this particular setting – they have a feminine feel yet there is something alien and futuristic about them (which is also the reason why I enjoy working with them so much). Rather than having them hanging from the walls in a garden type of way, I thought it would be more interesting to have them go many different directions, as if they were an army of white spiders spreading out over the mirrored walls." via
Zoom Info
coutugh:

150,000 orchids lining the walls of the Rodin Museum by Belgian florist Mark Colle for Christian Dior Haute Couture F/W 2014 

"The idea was to create transparency. Something very light. The use of phalaenopsis orchids was perfect in this particular setting – they have a feminine feel yet there is something alien and futuristic about them (which is also the reason why I enjoy working with them so much). Rather than having them hanging from the walls in a garden type of way, I thought it would be more interesting to have them go many different directions, as if they were an army of white spiders spreading out over the mirrored walls." via
Zoom Info

coutugh:

150,000 orchids lining the walls of the Rodin Museum by Belgian florist Mark Colle for Christian Dior Haute Couture F/W 2014 

"The idea was to create transparency. Something very light. The use of phalaenopsis orchids was perfect in this particular setting – they have a feminine feel yet there is something alien and futuristic about them (which is also the reason why I enjoy working with them so much). Rather than having them hanging from the walls in a garden type of way, I thought it would be more interesting to have them go many different directions, as if they were an army of white spiders spreading out over the mirrored walls." via

latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
Zoom Info
latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
Zoom Info
latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
Zoom Info
latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
Zoom Info
latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
Zoom Info

latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.

Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo

Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.

This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!

Jeff Watt 10-2010